Become the Master of Your Career – Part 4

Welcome once again! We’re wrapping up our Become the Master of Your Career series today with Part 4. You can revisit Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 if you need a refresher.

Don’t forget, our Career Readiness Badging Program allows you to become the master of your career by helping you make meaningful connections between your experiences here at USF and your life after graduation! You’re now well on your way to understanding what it takes to become a master, so you may want to consider signing up for one of our Career Readiness Badging Orientations. We only have a few orientation sessions left this semester, but we’ll be back with more in the Spring!

Now, let’s talk about the last two essential skills you need to become career ready: Critical Thinking and Global Citizenship!

critical-thinking

Critical Thinking
You use critical thinking skills every day when you do things like driving your car or choosing courses to fit your schedule. But when you want to show future employers that you’ve mastered the Critical Thinking essential skill, you’re not going to simply flash your driver’s license as proof.

Whereas most of the other essential skills have some kind of tangible manifestation, Critical Thinking is very cerebral. Master Critical Thinkers are able to obtain, interpret, and use knowledge, facts, and data to analyze issues, make decisions, and overcome problems. While you may have some type of final product, like a research paper, the original and creative thought process you use to get there isn’t always immediately understood by others. This can make talking about this skill to future employers a little difficult.

Through the Career Readiness Badging Program, we make having conversations about your mastery of the Critical Thinking essential skill easier. We’ve given you a few ideas about where you can learn this skill, like math courses, research workshops, and conferences related to your major or future career field. We have also partnered with offices across campus, like the Office of Undergraduate Research, to make sure that there are opportunities for you to get experience using this skill that you can put on your resume. One you’ve gotten some experience, we’ll help you discover ways that you can talk to employers about this essential skill with a sample interview question.

global-citizenship

Global Citizenship
USF is proud to be home to an incredibly diverse population of students, staff, and faculty that represent more than 125 countries! We’re nationally recognized as an institution that embraces its diversity and offers a variety of global opportunities to its students.

If you remember back to Part 1 of our series, we talked about NACE, the National Association of Colleges and Employers, and how they created the eight essential skills we’ve been talking about. Global Citizenship, the final essential skill we’ll discuss in our series, was just added to NACE’s list in January 2017. Its addition speaks to the importance of employees who are masters of Global Citizenship within our increasingly global economy.

Masters of the Global Citizenship essential skill value, respect, and learn from diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, sexual orientations, religions, and viewpoints. They are also open, inclusive, and sensitive, and are able to interact respectfully with all people.

Because USF is so diverse, there are tons of offices (like the Global Citizen Project) and student organizations (like the Latin American Student Association) on campus for you to get involved with. In fact, USF is home to 43 multicultural student organizations! You can find them all and learn how to get involved on BullSync.

As you start to learn about the Global Citizenship essential skill, find ways to get experience that is related to your major or future career field. Global Citizenship impacts every industry in some way, and even if the company you eventually work for only has domestic offices, you’ll still come into contact with people who have different backgrounds than you. Try doing some research into companies within your field of interest and see how they’re impacting their local and global community for ideas on where you can get experience and become a master of Global Citizenship!

 

We’ve spent the last couple of weeks telling you a little bit about each of the eight essential skills in our Career Readiness Badging Program, but there is so much more that you can learn! If you’re ready to become the master of your career, join us for one of our upcoming orientation sessions. We only have a few dates left this fall semester, but we’ll have a full schedule again in the Spring!

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Become the Master of Your Career – Part 3

Welcome to Part 3 of our Become the Master of Your Career series! If you’ve missed our last two blogs, you can catch up with Part 1 here and Part 2 here.

If you’re already on your way to becoming a master, awesome! Don’t forget, our Career Readiness Badging Program allows you to become the master of your career by helping you make meaningful connections between your experiences here at USF and your life after graduation!

Today, we’re going to cover two more of the essential skills you need to become career ready: Leadership and Teamwork!

leadership

Leadership
When you think about good leaders, who immediately comes to mind? What kind of traits do these people tend to have, and how do they interact with those that they are leading?

Being a good leader comes down to more than just a line on a resume. Masters of the Leadership essential skill work with the strengths of the people within their group and leverage each of these strengths to achieve common goals. They show empathy as they guide and motivate their team, and they’re able to use their interpersonal skills to coach and develop others so that their group grows together.

While some of the people you may look up to as leaders are politicians, CEOs, and well-known scientists, there are leaders all around you, and there are many opportunities for you to test your own leadership skills across campus. Getting involved in a leadership role in a student organization may be the most obvious way to build this essential skill, but you can also define yourself as a master leader in the classroom and as a student employee. The next time your professor assigns group work, focus on how you can encourage your group to actively participate in the work and help divide the tasks evenly based on the strengths of the team members. If you work on campus, talk to your supervisor about projects that they may want to do but don’t have time to do themselves, and ask them if you can work on it.

teamwork

Teamwork
Teamwork is an essential skill for just about every job and career field out there. Even if you plan on working for yourself, or in a role where you don’t interact with many people on a day-to-day basis, understanding this essential skill can help you at times when you do work with clients or colleagues.

Masters of the Teamwork essential skill are able to build collaborative relationships with people representing diverse cultures, races, ages, genders, religions, and viewpoints. Teamwork and Leadership go hand in hand, but you don’t have to be the group leader to work well in a team structure. Those who have mastered Teamwork can negotiate with their teammates and can manage conflict among the members of the group in order to work toward common goals.

At USF, the ways in which you can build your Teamwork skills are endless. Opportunities to work in a team setting can be found in the classroom, in students organizations, on intramural or collegiate sports teams, and in student employment roles.

 

Six essential skills down and only two more to go! Join us next time for Become the Master of Your Career – Part 4 to learn how you can master Critical Thinking and Global Citizenship!

If you’re ready to become career ready, consider joining us for one of our upcoming orientation sessions.

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Become the Master of Your Career – Part 2

Welcome back! In our last blog, we introduced our Career Readiness Badging Program and two of its essential skills that you can earn your badge in: Professionalism and Career Management. If you haven’t read it yet, you can catch up on those two skills here.

If you’re already on your way to becoming a master, awesome! Don’t forget, our Career Readiness Badging Program allows you to become the master of your career by helping you make meaningful connections between your experiences here at USF and your life after graduation!

Today we’re going to focus on two more of the essential skills you need to become career ready: Communications and Technology!

communications

Communications
This essential skill refers to both written and oral communications, like email, talking on the phone, memos, and face-to-face conversations. Communications involves the ability to clearly and effectively articulate your thoughts and ideas to another person. That may not seem too difficult, but master communicators know that a conversation depends not only on their own abilities, but also on how familiar their audience is with the topic.

For example, let’s say you’re working as a sales associate at an outdoor recreation store, and a customer who has never gone camping before comes up to you and asks you to explain the difference between two seemingly identical tents. The conversation that you have with this customer would be pretty different from the conversation you’d have with an experienced camper, but you’d be expected to be able to switch between both types of conversations in order to make sales goals for your store.

In order to master this essential skill, you’ll need to use your experiences in the classroom, on the job, and in your extracurricular activities to show how you can communicate with people familiar with the career field you want to go into and the customers you serve who may not be as familiar with the technical terms you use.

technology

Technology
No matter what career you might be thinking about pursuing, you’re probably going to use technology in your role. Mastering the Technology essential skill doesn’t mean that you have to be familiar with every single piece of existing software in the world – that would be impossible! Rather, being a master means that you’re able to adapt to new and emerging technologies and that you can use them to solve problems, complete tasks, and accomplish goals.

The best way to be able to understand how different technologies work and can be used is to start using them! Do a little bit of research to find out what kind of technology might be used in your career field or industry, and then start familiarizing yourself with them.

As a USF student, you have free access to Lynda.com through IT Services. Lynda.com offers online videos with courses and training programs for just about everything imaginable, and you can login easily through MyUSF.

The USF Tampa Libraries Digital Media Commons also offers opportunities to learn about some Adobe Creative Cloud products, like Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign. You can find their list of workshops and get information about their Digital Media Creation Badging Program on their website.

 

We’ve introduced you to four of the essential skills you should master in order to be career ready! Look out for our next blog post where we focus on two more of the skills: Teamwork and Leadership!

If you’re ready to become career ready, consider joining us for one of our upcoming orientation sessions.

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Become the Master of Your Career – Part 1

As a college student, your daily grind probably includes classes, student organizations, sports, jobs and internships, and sleep! How are you supposed to squeeze in time to get ready for life after graduation?

Psst. Guess what? You already are! USF prepares its students for their future careers in a number of ways, and for each student, that journey is a unique combination of their individual experiences.

What we’ve noticed in Career Services is that while our students have some fantastic ways of becoming “career ready,” they may not know how to connect those experiences in ways that will be meaningful to the employers who want to recruit them.

So, how can we help you speak the language of campus recruiters? That’s easy.

Learn It  >  Do It  >  Show It
In our new Career Readiness Badging Program, you’ll learn about the eight essential skills employers are looking for, what you need to do to develop these skills, and how you can show employers that you are a master of your career!

How do we know what employers are looking for? NACE, the National Association of Colleges and Employers, surveys employers around the country to find out what skills they say are essential for any incoming hire to have.

What are these skills? Let’s take a closer look at two of them today.

professionalism

Professionalism
What does being a “professional” mean? It probably depends on the job, right? Sure. Different industries have different ways of interpreting what it means to be a professional, but they all have some common themes that you can master while at USF.

Masters of professionalism are productive workers, arrive early or on-time for their shifts and to meetings, are humble about their achievements, and own up to and learn from their mistakes. They also act responsibly, which goes beyond simply meeting deadlines. By exceeding expectations and acting with the interests of the larger community in mind, those with professionalism skills become valuable assets for a company.

Through the Career Readiness Badging Program, you can demonstrate that you’ve learned about the professional essential skill in your coursework, through online learning programs (like Lynda.com), or through workshops or training programs.

career-management

Career Management
Those who have mastered career management have a pretty good idea about their career goals. They know their strengths, can talk about their experiences, and have built the skills and knowledge they will need to succeed in their future career. They know how and where to search for jobs related to their field, and they can advocate for themselves for promotions and raises in the workplace.

Through the Career Readiness Badging Program, you can demonstrate that you’ve learned about the career management essential skill in your coursework, through online learning programs (like Lynda.com), or through workshops or training programs.

In order to earn the badge for this essential skill, you’ll need to meet with a Career Consultant in our office. They can help you become a master of career management by working with you to talk about all of your other skills and experiences that are beneficial to the jobs you want to apply for.

 

Professionalism and Career Management are just two of the essential skills you’ll need to become a master of your career. Look for our next blog post to discuss two more skills you’ll need: Communications and Technology!

If you’re ready to become career ready, consider joining us for one of our upcoming orientation sessions.

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Until Grad School …

You have finally walked across the stage, shaken hands with President Judy Genshaft, and received your diploma. Many graduates plan to continue their education in graduate or professional school. There are many reasons to consider furthering your education right away, but what if you’re not ready for that step yet? In today’s post, we’ll discuss possible options that you can consider until you’re ready for grad school.

Entry-Level Jobs
When you graduate with your undergraduate degree, you will likely pursue one of two paths: furthering your education or entering the workforce. While some students go straight to grad school and others may have plans of returning to school later, the vast majority of students choose to immediately begin working in entry-level positions.

Entering the world of work allows you to begin using your degree instantly. You’re able to gain experience and continue to build on the essential skills that you developed in college. You’re also able to start establishing yourself financially, and while this isn’t impossible to do in graduate school, it may be a little easier to do.

Entry-level jobs also help you understand the industry that you have decided to work within. You can learn from your supervisors and coworkers, ask questions about how upper management makes their decisions, and continue to build your professional network in ways that can help you advance your career. Learning the ins and outs of the company and industry that you work within can help you determine whether or not furthering your education may be the right choice for you and can help you select an appropriate program of study.

If you’re considering an entry-level position, check out our Spring 2018 Career & Internship Fair Week. Employers will continue to register up until the week before the first fair on January 31, 2018, so mark your calendars now!

Internships
Myth: Internships are only for current students. Fact: Many companies accept recent graduates into their internship programs on a track toward full-time employment.

If you focused on your studies during your undergraduate years, a post-graduate internship can help you get some work experience on your resume. This allows the company to test your essential skills, like professionalism, teamwork, and communication and gives you an opportunity to see if you like the position and company before you agree to a full-time role.

To find these opportunities, you can attend our Spring 2018 Career & Internship Fair Week, but you may want to check out our other employer events as well. On November 14, we have an Industry Networking Night event for the Financial Services Industry, which will allow you to meet with representatives from a few companies all in one place. You don’t have to be a business or finance major to attend, but you should have an interest in working within the Financial Services Industry.

You can check out all of our opportunities to meet with employers on campus in Handshake in the Events and Fairs sections of the site. You can also use Handshake to do research on your own to see which companies have internships available for seniors or recent graduates.

Trade Schools and Certifications
Graduate and professional schools are not the only places where you can pursue post-graduate education. Trade schools are institutions that are focused on teaching their students a particular skill or about a specific industry. These include art institutes, technical schools, and specialists schools.

You can also consider pursuing a certificate program. These are often offered at colleges and universities and are less intense than graduate programs. They may be less expensive, require fewer classes, and take less time to complete than a traditional Master’s degree. Certifications are offered for a variety of different subjects or technologies. If you’re planning to work in a technology-driven industry or role, you can get certifications for Adobe, Microsoft, and Google, to name a few.

For both trade schools and certifications, be sure to do your research about what is offered, how much it will cost, how long it will take, and whether or not it will benefit you in your industry. If you need help considering this option or beginning your search, schedule an appointment with your Career Consultant through Handshake.

Time Off
If you take time off between graduating with your undergraduate degree and pursuing graduate school or entering the workforce, you may get some questions about what you did with that time during the interview process for your future program or job. Rather than going back home and working in a part-time job (a trap that Don Asher says you may not escape from!), consider taking time to explore your interests. A common option is to travel domestically or internationally. Even though it’s something a lot of people do, you can use this time to help you narrow your interests and solidify your passion for the field that you enter when you return, so don’t be afraid to talk about your unique experience during interviews.

If you absolutely have to return home, but still plan on going to graduate school or entering the world of work later, make your time off count. You may need to have a part-time or even full-time job to help make ends meet and begin paying off student loans if you have them, but you should also consider getting involved in your community. Volunteering can be a great way to demonstrate to a future program administrator or interviewer that you have passion and drive. If you can find volunteer opportunities within an area that you plan to continue to study or work, this will give you some great hands-on experience that can make you stand out during the application process.